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T1 - Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis

KW - Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis

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T1 - Glaucoma associated with Boston type i keratoprosthesis

N2 - PURPOSE: To evaluate outcomes of the Boston type I keratoprosthesis (KPro) and associated incidence of glaucoma. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: All patients who underwent KPro surgery at 1 institution from 2003 to 2009 with at least 3 months of follow-up. METHODS: Preoperative visual acuity, diagnosis, history of glaucoma, and intraoperative and postoperative parameters were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed to identify factors that may influence increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and glaucoma development or progression after surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), IOP, postoperative medical and surgical treatments for glaucoma, and KPro retention and complications. RESULTS: Thirty-six KPro procedures were performed in 30 eyes of 29 patients with a mean (±SD) follow-up of 17 ± 19 months (range, 3-67 months). The main indication for KPro implantation was corneal graft failure (77%). Primary KPro procedures were performed in 23% of eyes for limbal stem cell deficiency secondary to chemical burns and aniridia and for herpetic disease. Median preoperative BCVA was hand motions with an overall improvement to 20/330 (range, 20/20 to hand motions) at 9 months postoperatively; mean BCVA was 20/600 (range, 20/40 to NLP) at the last follow-up. Twenty eyes (67%) had a preoperative history of glaucoma, with 8 of those eyes (40%) having undergone previous glaucoma surgery. Twenty-one eyes (70%) underwent concomitant glaucoma surgery. Postoperative increased IOP (22 mm Hg or higher) was noted in 15 eyes (50%), although definite glaucoma development or progression was noted in 7 of those 15 eyes (23% of total eyes). Mean BCVA at the last follow-up in eyes with glaucoma development or progression was 3/200 compared with 20/563 in the remaining 23 eyes. Six patients (20%) required repeat KPro implantation, and retroprosthetic membranes developed in 23 eyes (77%). No patient had vitritis or infectious endophthalmitis develop. CONCLUSIONS: The Boston type I KPro is an effective option for management of eyes with poor prognosis for primary or repeat penetrating keratoplasty. Visual potential is limited by preoperative comorbidities; however, glaucoma development or progression of preexisting glaucoma is a significant cause of postoperative visual loss. Rigorous perioperative management of elevated IOP is essential for long-term success of KPro surgery.

Purpose To study the long-term outcomes of Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis (KPro) surgery.

N2 - PURPOSE: To compare the University of California Davis experience using the Boston keratoprosthesis with the Boston Keratoprosthesis Study Group's initial report. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. PARTICIPANTS: We analyzed 30 eyes of 28 patients who previously underwent Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis surgery at our institution between 2004 and 2008. METHODS: Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Visual acuity and keratoprosthesis stability. RESULTS: Preoperative diagnoses were failed graft (26 eyes, 87%), chemical injury (3 eyes, 10%), and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (1 eye, 3%). Twenty eyes (66%) had preoperative glaucoma. Preoperative best-corrected visual acuity ranged from 20/150 to light perception and was

KW - Boston type I keratoprosthesis

T1 - Long-term outcomes of Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis implantation

AB - PURPOSE: To compare the University of California Davis experience using the Boston keratoprosthesis with the Boston Keratoprosthesis Study Group's initial report. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. PARTICIPANTS: We analyzed 30 eyes of 28 patients who previously underwent Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis surgery at our institution between 2004 and 2008. METHODS: Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Visual acuity and keratoprosthesis stability. RESULTS: Preoperative diagnoses were failed graft (26 eyes, 87%), chemical injury (3 eyes, 10%), and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (1 eye, 3%). Twenty eyes (66%) had preoperative glaucoma. Preoperative best-corrected visual acuity ranged from 20/150 to light perception and was

PURPOSE: To compare the University of California Davis experience using the Boston keratoprosthesis with the Boston Keratoprosthesis Study Group's initial report. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. PARTICIPANTS: We analyzed 30 eyes of 28 patients who previously underwent Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis surgery at our institution between 2004 and 2008. METHODS: Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Visual acuity and keratoprosthesis stability. RESULTS: Preoperative diagnoses were failed graft (26 eyes, 87%), chemical injury (3 eyes, 10%), and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (1 eye, 3%). Twenty eyes (66%) had preoperative glaucoma. Preoperative best-corrected visual acuity ranged from 20/150 to light perception and was

with Boston type i keratoprosthesis

KW - Boston type I keratoprosthesis

The Boston Type 2 Keratoprosthesis (KPro) is an artificial device used to replace the cornea in the setting of diseases with severe, recurrent scarring in which other types of corneal transplants are not a viable option. A complete tarsorrhaphy is performed and the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) optic of the device projects through an opening created in the upper eyelid. The device in this photograph was placed in a patient with severe ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP).

Keratoprosthesis implantation is a procedure that involves full-thickness removal of the cornea and replacement by an artificial cornea. The Boston Type I Keratoprosthesis is currently the most commonly used keratoprosthesis device in the US. It consists of a clear plastic polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) optic and back plate sandwiched around a corneal graft and secured with a titanium locking ring (Figure 15). After the device is assembled, a partial-thickness trephination is performed on the host cornea. Full-thickness resection of the patient's cornea is then completed using curved corneal scissors. The keratoprosthesis is then secured to host tissue using interrupted or running sutures. Generally, patients who have a history of multiple failed PKs are candidates for a keratoprosthesis transplant. Other indications include severe keratitis or ocular surface disease resulting from limbal stem cell failure, such as (Figure 16), , (Figure 17) and chemical injury (, ). The Boston Type II Keratoprosthesis is a similar device with a longer optic designed to extend through an opening made in the upper eyelid (Figure 19). It is indicated for the most severe cicatrizing ocular surface diseases.

Boston type I keratoprosthesis: Review - SciELO
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Because implantation of the Boston keratoprosthesis type II

PURPOSE: To evaluate outcomes of the Boston type I keratoprosthesis (KPro) and associated incidence of glaucoma. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: All patients who underwent KPro surgery at 1 institution from 2003 to 2009 with at least 3 months of follow-up. METHODS: Preoperative visual acuity, diagnosis, history of glaucoma, and intraoperative and postoperative parameters were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed to identify factors that may influence increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and glaucoma development or progression after surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), IOP, postoperative medical and surgical treatments for glaucoma, and KPro retention and complications. RESULTS: Thirty-six KPro procedures were performed in 30 eyes of 29 patients with a mean (±SD) follow-up of 17 ± 19 months (range, 3-67 months). The main indication for KPro implantation was corneal graft failure (77%). Primary KPro procedures were performed in 23% of eyes for limbal stem cell deficiency secondary to chemical burns and aniridia and for herpetic disease. Median preoperative BCVA was hand motions with an overall improvement to 20/330 (range, 20/20 to hand motions) at 9 months postoperatively; mean BCVA was 20/600 (range, 20/40 to NLP) at the last follow-up. Twenty eyes (67%) had a preoperative history of glaucoma, with 8 of those eyes (40%) having undergone previous glaucoma surgery. Twenty-one eyes (70%) underwent concomitant glaucoma surgery. Postoperative increased IOP (22 mm Hg or higher) was noted in 15 eyes (50%), although definite glaucoma development or progression was noted in 7 of those 15 eyes (23% of total eyes). Mean BCVA at the last follow-up in eyes with glaucoma development or progression was 3/200 compared with 20/563 in the remaining 23 eyes. Six patients (20%) required repeat KPro implantation, and retroprosthetic membranes developed in 23 eyes (77%). No patient had vitritis or infectious endophthalmitis develop. CONCLUSIONS: The Boston type I KPro is an effective option for management of eyes with poor prognosis for primary or repeat penetrating keratoplasty. Visual potential is limited by preoperative comorbidities; however, glaucoma development or progression of preexisting glaucoma is a significant cause of postoperative visual loss. Rigorous perioperative management of elevated IOP is essential for long-term success of KPro surgery.

However, as in keratoprosthesis type I surgery,

AB - PURPOSE: To evaluate outcomes of the Boston type I keratoprosthesis (KPro) and associated incidence of glaucoma. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: All patients who underwent KPro surgery at 1 institution from 2003 to 2009 with at least 3 months of follow-up. METHODS: Preoperative visual acuity, diagnosis, history of glaucoma, and intraoperative and postoperative parameters were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed to identify factors that may influence increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and glaucoma development or progression after surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), IOP, postoperative medical and surgical treatments for glaucoma, and KPro retention and complications. RESULTS: Thirty-six KPro procedures were performed in 30 eyes of 29 patients with a mean (±SD) follow-up of 17 ± 19 months (range, 3-67 months). The main indication for KPro implantation was corneal graft failure (77%). Primary KPro procedures were performed in 23% of eyes for limbal stem cell deficiency secondary to chemical burns and aniridia and for herpetic disease. Median preoperative BCVA was hand motions with an overall improvement to 20/330 (range, 20/20 to hand motions) at 9 months postoperatively; mean BCVA was 20/600 (range, 20/40 to NLP) at the last follow-up. Twenty eyes (67%) had a preoperative history of glaucoma, with 8 of those eyes (40%) having undergone previous glaucoma surgery. Twenty-one eyes (70%) underwent concomitant glaucoma surgery. Postoperative increased IOP (22 mm Hg or higher) was noted in 15 eyes (50%), although definite glaucoma development or progression was noted in 7 of those 15 eyes (23% of total eyes). Mean BCVA at the last follow-up in eyes with glaucoma development or progression was 3/200 compared with 20/563 in the remaining 23 eyes. Six patients (20%) required repeat KPro implantation, and retroprosthetic membranes developed in 23 eyes (77%). No patient had vitritis or infectious endophthalmitis develop. CONCLUSIONS: The Boston type I KPro is an effective option for management of eyes with poor prognosis for primary or repeat penetrating keratoplasty. Visual potential is limited by preoperative comorbidities; however, glaucoma development or progression of preexisting glaucoma is a significant cause of postoperative visual loss. Rigorous perioperative management of elevated IOP is essential for long-term success of KPro surgery.

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